The Pros and Cons of Gabion Masonry According to Masonry Contractors

The Perks and Drawbacks of Gabion for Masonry

An area that can be added to a man-made wall using gabions is created from a rectangular steel wire mesh basket that is filled with small rocks. Hundreds of gabions can be locked and stacked on top of one another. Their purpose is to act as a barrier to prevent or slow down erosion processes brought on by water or excessive seepage on steep or flat slopes.

If you are planning to use gabions for your next masonry project, be sure to seek assistance from a professional masonry contractor for proper installation. Although gabions have some blatant downsides, they also have several positive environmental benefits.

Advantages

  • Due to the adaptability of their wire mesh construction, gabion walls resist breaking and separating. They are resilient enough to withstand repeated stream flow and wave battering. The rocks and gravel used in gabion construction are part of nature and can withstand years of deterioration from water erosion. The galvanized wire used to make the mesh is resistant to rust and corrosion.
  • The pebble and gravel used in the building of gabion walls provide good permeability, allowing for adequate natural drainage of runoff while reducing water velocity by breaking it up and dispersing the pressure over a large region.
  • Gabion buildings have a bad reputation for seeming out of place and unnatural near rivers, ponds, and beaches. Instead of forming rugged, natural-looking rock barriers, the front-facing walls have a bland, mechanical appearance. When particularly strong and long walls are required to preserve expansive beach areas, they are built on tourist beaches as a diversion.

Disadvantages

  • Although gabion walls are a cost-effective option for the majority of applications, they are nonetheless more expensive to install than riprap or naturally vegetated slopes. Construction of gabion walls necessitates the use of heavy machinery since large wall sections must be placed in position via mechanical lifts.
  • To ensure their integrity, gabion walls need to be inspected frequently. After any storm that has resulted in a heavier-than-normal water flow, they must also be checked out and evaluated right afterward.
  • Although gabion walls are a cost-effective option for the majority of applications, they are nonetheless more expensive to install than riprap or naturally vegetated slopes. Construction of gabion walls necessitates the use of heavy machinery since large wall sections must be placed in position via mechanical lifts.

Howlins LLC has the best masonry contractor you can find in Chester, PA. Call us at (610) 424-0928 today!